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Which grind is best for your coffee maker?


coffee grind size chart
How you grind your coffee influence the final brew. Over grinding or not grinding enough can ruin the taste of coffee. Freshly ground coffee bean is required to make bold and rich taste coffee. So it is important to understand the right coffee grind size for different brewing method.

Low cost grinders usually doesn't have coarseness settings, so you have to experiment on how long to let your machine grind to get the proper coarseness.

To make it easier to understand just how fine is extra fine, or any other question related to coffee grind size? These comparisons might assist you to adjust your coffee grinder a little much better:

Coffee Grinding Size Chart


image grind size
extra coarse

Best for: Cold brew

The extra coarse grounds need a longer extraction time, and cold brew usually steeps for 12 hours
coarse

Best for: french press coffee, cupping, or a standard percolator

On average, french press coffee takes about 4 minutes, which, while marginally shorter than cold brew, is still on the longer end of the brewing scale.
medium coarse

Best for: Chemex, clever dripper, or cafe solo brewers do best with medium-coarse grounds.
medium

Best for: drip coffee.
medium fine

Best for: Cone-shaped pour over brews, siphon coffee, and flat bottom drip machines.
fine

Best for: espresso coffee maker
super fine

Best for: Turkish coffee

How Does Grind Affect Extraction?


Your coffee grind size is the main component determining the extraction. A great-tasting cup requires using the correct coffee-to-water ratio, correct temperature, correct time but also the precise grind. Under-extraction happens when the grinds are too coarse. This results in a cup that tastes sour, acidic, and salty. The opposite problem occurs when the grounds are too fine and your coffee turns out over-extracted.

FAQ


How Does Coffee Grind Size Affect Extraction?


Your coffee grind size is the main component determining the extraction. A great-tasting cup requires using the correct coffee-to-water ratio, correct temperature, correct time but also the precise grind. Under-extraction happens when the grinds are too coarse. This results in a cup that tastes sour, acidic, and salty. The opposite problem occurs when the grounds are too fine and your coffee turns out over-extracted.

Can I Grind My Coffee In a Blender?


A blender uses metallic blades at a high speed. This just creates a mess. The grind size is inconsistent and comes with unwanted heat and friction. You're better off buying pre-ground coffee in this case.

How Do I Know I’m Using the Right Grind Size?


The best way to perfect your brewing and grinding is to taste the difference when adjusting the coffee grind. Soon, you'll be able to tell what type of grind will ensure optimal extraction.

How Quickly Does Ground Coffee Lose Freshness?


As soon as coffee comes in contact with air, it starts oxidizing, which affects the taste. Some coffee enthusiasts claim than freshly ground coffee maintains optimal qualities for brewing for as short as 30 minutes before it starts deteriorating. Some of the coffee grinds at the top of the bag or the container are in touch with air more than the ones below.

Does a Finer Grind Size Make Stronger Coffee?


A finer grind speeds up the extraction which is going to make the coffee taste stronger. But this is often at the expense of over-extraction and making it gritty and bitter. The term "strong" in coffee is relative and depends on many other factors such as type of roast, region, and acidity.